Tag Archives: SharePoint 2013

Creating External Content Types in SPD Preview 2013

I am using SharePoint Designer 2013 Preview. I recently tried to create a new External Content Type and ran into an issue when adding a data source. SharePoint Designer hangs “Loading Data Sources”. Fortunately, there’s a work-around…

Copy the following commands to a batch file and run it as an elevated administrator on the SPD machine:

reg add HKLMSOFTWAREMicrosoftStrongNameVerification*,71e9bce111e9429c /f
reg add HKLMSOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoftStrongNameVerification*,71e9bce111e9429c /f
reg add HKLMSOFTWAREMicrosoftStrongNameVerification*,* /f
reg add HKLMSOFTWAREWow6432NodeMicrosoftStrongNameVerification*,* /f

Recycle the Windows Installer service (or start it if stopped).

You should be good to go.

Thanks to a user called Dalibor, for this info Winking smile

Configuring SharePoint 2013 for Windows Azure Workflow

SharePoint 2013 now abstracts workflow processing to the cloud – using Windows Azure Workflow (WAW). SharePoint still maintains the legacy workflow engine, as part of the .NET Framework 3.5.1, to enable execution of SharePoint 2010 workflows. However, SharePoint 2013 does not install WAW by default. The following steps detail additional configuration.

1. Ensure you are not installing on a domain controller – WAW integration does not work with SharePoint 2013 running on a single server domain controller

2. Create an account in your domain for WAW

3. Add this account to the local administrators group on the SharePoint server and grant log on locally permissions

4. Ensure the SQL server accepts connections via TCP/IP – use the SQL Server Configuration Manager tool

5. Provide the WAW account access to SQL Server, include create database permissions (or you could grant administrative permissions if you are brave)

6. Log onto the SharePoint server as that account

7. Install Workflow Beta 1.0 (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj193478), using the Web Platform Installer

8. After installation, you should see the WAW Configuration Wizard

9. Click to create a new farm, using custom settings

10. Configure databases and click the Test Connection button for each

11. Make sure the WAW service account is correct – use the fully qualified domain name (FQDN), by default it prepopulates the textbox with a non-FQDN

12. Provide certificate generation keys

13. Leave the ports as default

14. Check the checkbox to allow management over HTTP (if you choose to use HTTPS you will need to establish trust between SharePoint and WAW using a trusted certificate)

15. Click the next button to move onto configuring the service bus

16. Complete similar steps for database, service account, and certificates settings as you did above

17. Again, leave the ports as default

18. Review the summary page, then click the tick button to complete the configuration

19. Wait for the configuration to complete – this might take a little time

20. After WAW configuration completes, run the following PowerShell command:

Register-SPWorkflowService –SPSite "http://{sitecollectionurl}" –WorkflowHostUri "http://{workflowserve}:12291" –AllowOAuthHttp

21. Assuming no errors, you have now configured WAW in SharePoint 2013 for your site collection

More information on installing and configuring WAW is available at the following URL: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj658588%28v=office.15%29

The context has expired and can no longer be used

I routinely see this error when working with SharePoint 2013 in my development environment. This problem is more frequent when I restore earlier snapshots of my SP2013 server.

SharePoint spits out this error when the local server time is out of sync. To remedy this issue, try one of the following:

  1. Update the date and time on the SharePoint Server
  2. Disable security context check for the web application, as follows
  1. Go to central administration
  2. Go to  "Application management section
  3. Go to "Web Application General Settings"
  4. Go to "Web page Security validation"  disable this option.

SharePoint 2013 Managed Navigation

After much awaited anticipation, SharePoint 2013 now offers custom navigation of sites via the Managed Metadata Term Store. SharePoint 2010 introduced managed metadata for tagging purposes, with hierarchical terms. This same hierarchical infrastructure bodes well for site navigation, which is also hierarchical. I often hear the word “taxonomy” said a lot, pertaining to both tagging taxonomy and site structure, which just speaks to the fact that the Managed Metadata Term Store is great for managing custom navigation.

Prior to SharePoint 2013, custom navigation typically involved some custom component, to read navigation structure from either a list, XML file, or some other hierarchical node store. The out-of-the-box offering provided very little in the way of custom navigation – just the ability to include headers and links at each site level. The main issue with the out-of-the-box offering is that it was limited in the number of nested navigation nodes, without adhering to the actual structure of sites and sub-sites in the collection. Despite typical site navigation following site structure, content owners should have the ability to store their content (sites and pages) in any structure and the navigation look completely different. Content storage and structure suits how content owners maintain content, and navigation is about how end users access content, and the two may look very different. Managed Metadata Navigation finally allows content owners to create an independent navigation structure to that of their content model.

To demonstrate Managed Navigation, I shall first create a hierarchy in the default term store, for our application:

  1. Open Central Administration
  2. Click the link for managed service applications
  3. Scroll down the list and click the Managed Metadata Service
  4. Click the Manage icon in the ribbon to open the Term Store editor
  5. Ensure you have permissions to edit the term store – add your username to the term store administrators field
  6. Managed navigation binds to term sets, so I created a new group for navigation and then a term set for site navigation

SharePoint creates a default term set in the Managed Metadata Term Store for your site collection; I created my own for demonstration purposes.

  1. Create a term set structure
  2. Click the Site Navigation term set
  3. In the right panel, click the tab for Intended Use
  4. Check the checkbox to enable the term set for navigation – you can also use the term set for tagging if you wish by toggling the other checkbox option
  5. Click the save button to save the changes
  6. Click the tab for term driven pages – this page shows the settings for friendly URLs for the term set (more on friendly URLs shortly)
  7. Now we are ready to configure our publishing site to use the managed navigation
  8. Open your publishing site (assuming the hosting web application uses the managed metadata service you just configured)
  9. Click the gear icon, the select the menu item for site settings
  10. Click the link for Navigation, under the Look and Feel header
  11. SharePoint displays the navigation settings page
  12. Choose the radio button option for Managed Navigation for either or both the left and global (top) navigation
  13. Scroll to the bottom of the page to the managed navigation term set section
  14. Select the term set to use for managed navigation
  15. The checkboxes below the term set browser tell SharePoint whether to populate your term set with nodes when you create new pages in the site, and whether to generate friendly URLs for new pages
  16. Click the OK button at the bottom of the page, to save your changes

managednav2013